Tag Archives: PRSA

PRSA Greater Cleveland Recognizes Winners of Hill Lighthouse Young Awards

 

CLEVELAND – April 12, 2018 – The Public Relations Society of America’s (PRSA) Greater Cleveland Chapter recognized three area communications professionals with its prestigious Hill, Lighthouse and Young Awards at a luncheon ceremony yesterday, April 11.

L-R: David Gilbert, Barbara Paynter, Julie Miller

The John W. Hill Award is presented each year to the chief executive of a Greater Cleveland area organization who provides outstanding leadership and support for internal and external communications. The 2018 Hill Award was presented to David Gilbert, president and CEO of Destination Cleveland as well as president and CEO of the Greater Cleveland Sports Commission.

The Lighthouse Award is presented each year to recognize the career accomplishments, contributions to the profession and community service of a senor public relations professional who is a member of PRSA Greater Cleveland. The 2018 Lighthouse Awards was presented to Barbara Paynter, APR, Fellow PRSA who is president of Paynter Communications.

The Davis Young Award is presented each year to recognize a professional who excels in mentoring students and young professionals through hands-on instruction and support. The 2018 Young Award was presented to Julie Miller, APR, associate professor and director of public relations programs at Baldwin Wallace University.

“The caliber of the people we honored at this awards luncheon distinguishes the Greater Cleveland PRSA chapter as one of the finest in the nation,” said Bob Rotatori, PRSA Cleveland president. “It was a great honor to be part of it and witness the occasion with so many of our colleagues.”

More than 70 Cleveland-area communications professionals attended the awards presentation which took place at the Union Club. The event was sponsored by Vitamix Corporation, Eaton Corporation and Dominion East Ohio Gas.

Ethics and Our Society

By Chris Lynch, APR, Fellow PRSA

Falls Communications and PRSA Cleveland Programming Chair

According to the recent 2017 eKG Survey by PRSA of its 21,000 membership of public relations and communications professional practitioners, the most important value that PRSA provides is our Society’s Code of Ethics.

The Ethics Code also ranked number one in the survey’s competitive index, which in essence, said it was the most important feature our members tell other practitioners as the reason they joined or would recommend PRSA to other professionals.

Recently two articles by major U.S. media outlets lumped non-ethical PR practices onto the usual, all-encompassing reporting that eluded those in our profession are practically nothing more than “spin doctors or glorified snake oil salesmen” … yes, really still … by the same fourth estate scribes that turn around the next day begging us for story background and content.

Fortunately, PRSA National in New York keeps its finger on the pulse of these musings, and has – as usual – been right on top of these media misperceptions. You may have seen this in last week’s PRSA correspondence to members (I know, oftentimes there is so much email from the Mother Ship, we don’t see the important things), but to reiterate:

Our 2018 PRSA Chair, Anthony D’Angelo, APR, Fellow PRSA responded immediately through advocacy with two significant Letters to the Editor correcting the misperception of our industry and its practitioners.

One, when the Los Angeles Times’ February 2 Los Angeles Times op-ed by Virginia Heffernan was critical of White House Director of Communications, Hope Hicks, and her qualifications for the job, which is perhaps to be expected given that Hicks is a public figure who works for a controversial president. What was both unexpected and unacceptable was Heffernan’s broad criticism of public relations professionals, as she described PR’s “moral flexibility, callousness and charm,” and claimed “lying to the media is traditionally called PR.” Here is PRSA’s response.

The other came the following week when, the demise of the British agency Bell Pottinger (which described itself as a public relations firm), appeared in a story describing its actions on page one of Monday’s New York Times. In fairness, PRSA agrees writer David Segal did a masterful job detailing the firm’s unethical behavior, expulsion from the U.K. Public Relations and Communications Association, and its loss of all clients. However, per D’Angelo’s note to Society members, “I don’t fault The New York Times for covering the story — it’s important. But as chair of the Society that represents the ethical practice of public relations, I was compelled to write a letter to the editor stressing that what Bell Pottinger did is definitely #NotOurPR.”

I was fortunate enough to serve with Tony when I was on the National Board of Directors for PRSA.  It’s nice to see he’s still active, and still has our backs. As he said on the topic of Ethics: “By subscribing to and promoting our Code of Ethics in public relations, which is the right thing to do, is ultimately best for business as well as our industry and all the publics we serve.

 

It’s Time for Change and Time for Engagement

By Bob Rotatori, Rotatori Consulting and PRSA Cleveland President for 2018

President – Bob Rotatori, Rotatori Consulting

It’s Time for Change and Time for Engagement!

I have a love-hate relationship with “change.” But all in all, I think change is good especially when it helps people become reinvigorated and energized. And, PRSA Cleveland is no exception to the change energy I feel for 2018. 

The 2018 Greater Cleveland Chapter Board has new initiatives in programming, membership and communications to share. This year, one of our major goals is engagement at all levels of membership – from the New PRos to the masters, from agencies to sole practitioners, from corporations to non-profits. We want PRSA Cleveland to be an integral part of your professional life and growth. 

We know this cannot be done in a vacuum, and we encourage all members to be involved. In addition to participating in events and programs, we invite you to join one of the many committees and projects to help in the direction and process, build relationships, and make the most of your membership.

I am humbled and honored to represent PRSA Cle as president this year, and I look forward to engaging with all of you. Be engaged and keep in touch…

Best,

Bob Rotatori

New in Town? Tips for Cleveland Newbies

By Rachel Burns, Coordinator of Communications & Operations, University Hospitals

Moving to a new city can be exciting and challenging for many reasons. Here are a few professional tips that I learned after moving to Cleveland from Chicago a year ago.

Settle in and explore.

You just moved to Cleveland. Take a moment to settle into your new home, neighborhood and city. You’ve likely heard Cleveland has changed and grown over the years, use this time to explore all that it has to offer. I love to read Cleveland Scene for local news and events.

Become involved.

Once you’re settled in and have had a chance to see Cleveland, take the time to research professional or volunteer opportunities. A new city is a new chance to explore your interests and become involved with an organization and meet like-minded people. Reach out to members to learn more about the opportunity, it’s a great way to build your professional and personally network. Also, Engage! Cleveland is popular among Cleveland’s young professionals and is a resource for getting them connected and established in Cleveland.

Looking for a job?

If you’re new to Cleveland and looking for a position, there are a variety of resources at your fingertips. Be sure to check out the current jobs posted on PRSACleveland.org. Also, HunterComm is an e-newsletter you can subscribe to and receive the latest communications and marketing jobs in Northeast Ohio. In addition to online research, networking and attending professional events is a fantastic way to learn about opportunities or a new company that might not appear in your online searches.

Build a network.

Be sure to engage with others and build your network beyond the period of your job hunt. Take the time to schedule meetings with individuals that share similar interests or careers and try to stick to regular meetings with them. This is also a great opportunity to develop a mentor and/or mentee relationship. Looking for a place to meet? The West Side Market Cafe is in a popular Cleveland destination and has available parking, which is always a plus.

Lastly, PRSA always welcomes professionals that are new to the Cleveland area. Check out our events or reach out to any of the board members if you’re interested in learning more about the Cleveland chapter.

AN ONLINE MASTER’S DEGREE IN IMC FROM WVU — AN INVESTMENT IN YOUR FUTURE

 

 

By Matthew Cummings, assistant director of online programs for West Virginia University’s Reed College of Media

“At the end of the day, it’s all about ROI.”

Our time and money are simply too valuable to invest in opportunities that do not provide a positive return — whether it’s a business deal, a client relationship or hiring decision.

At the WVU Reed College of Media, we believe a student’s decision to pursue an online master’s degree should be no different. The WVU IMC Master’s degree program is an award-winning, 33-credit program with more than 30 online courses. And it’s always evolving based on industry innovations and best practices.

At the center of the curriculum are core courses, which provide all students with a solid marketing communications foundation. The core is enhanced by a wide variety of specialty courses and more than 20 electives that allow students to focus on individual areas of interest. The degree can be completed online in as little as 18 months, and no residency is required.

As an administrator and instructor in West Virginia University’s Integrated Marketing Communications online graduate program, it is my job to help students achieve ROI on their master’s degrees — and I’m not only talking about the “soft” ROI many think of such as improved knowledge, skills and abilities.

To calculate quantifiable ROI, we regularly measure the direct impact our master’s degree is having on individuals through alumni and student success surveys. In our most recent survey conducted this fall, we learned that WVU IMC students highly value their education and that our program has offered a significant ROI:

  • 98% of respondents said they have or would recommend the program to a friend/colleague;
  • 88% believe that their IMC master’s degree directly led them to a better position and/or promotion;
  • 55% of all respondents had seen an income increase of more than 15%; and
  • 71% of respondents who graduated three or more years ago indicated that their income increased 15% or more and 50% of those report an increase of 25% or more.

In fact, we have partnered with the Public Relations Society of America and local chapters like the Greater Cleveland Chapter of PRSA because IMC meets an important PR industry need. PRSA members around the country have consistently identified IMC as one of the top five competencies public relations and communication professionals will need in the future, according to PRSA CEO Joe Truncale.

As you know, Mr. Truncale will be in Cleveland April 27 to discuss the changing demands on the profession, ethical issues and the importance of sharpening skill sets and competencies. WVU College of Media Assistant Dean Chad Mezera and I will be there too and we invite you to learn more about how an online IMC master’s degree can help prepare you and make a positive investment in your future.

We are proud of the fact that so many IMC students have been able to apply the skills they learned to move ahead professionally — and the industry tells us this need will continue to grow.

We look forward to meeting you!

Matthew Cummings teaches IMC 610, the WVU IMC graduate program’s introductory course.